hologram

Spanish Citizens Hold First Hologram Protest

Spanish Citizens Hold First Hologram Protest

hologram

We’ve seen technology used over and over again when it comes to protest, just look at how Egyptians sparked a revolution using Facebook. But what happens when the laws are set up so that protesting or even gathering is considered illegal?

 

Holograms is the answer. Yes, the same technology that allowed Tupac Shakur to seemingly be brought back to life a few years ago at Coachella.

 

Spanish citizens have organized what is considered the first hologram protest in history in order to fight for their rights are fighting for their rights using holograms without violating the new guidelines of the National Security Act, the new amendments to the Penal Code and the Anti-terror law.

 

Here are some of the rules from the Ley Mordaza or what the citizens are calling the “Gag Law”:

  • Photographing or recording police – 600 to 30.000€ fine.
  • Peaceful disobedience to authority – 600 to 30.000€ fine.
  • Occupying banks as means of protest – 600 to 30.000€ fine.
  • Not formalizing a protest – 600 to 30.000€ fine.
  • For carrying out assemblies or meetings in public spaces – 100 to 600€ fine.
  • For impeding or stopping an eviction – 600 to 30.000€ fine.
  • For presence at an occupied space (not only social centers but also houses occupied by evicted families) – 100 to 600€ fine.
  • Police black lists for protesters, activists and alternative press have been legalized.
  • Meeting or gathering in front of Congress – 600 to 30.000€ fine.
  • Appealing the fines in court requires the payment of judicial costs, whose amount depends on the fine.
  • It allows random identity checks, allowing for racial profiling of immigrants and minorities.
  • Police can now carry out raids at their discretion, without the need for “order” to have been disrupted.
  • External bodily searches are also now allowed at police discretion.
  • The government can prohibit any protest at will, if it feels “order” will be disrupted.
  • Any ill-defined “critical infrastructure” is now considered a forbidden zone for public gatherings if it might affect their functioning.
  • There are also fines for people who climb buildings and monuments without permission. (This has been a common method of protest from organizations like Greenpeace.)

 

The law also regulates internet freedom stating that calls for demonstrations or protests may be subject to penalties and fines for organizers or facilitators.

 

This hologram movement truly seems like something right out of the Hollywood blockbuster, The Hunger Games, but, in reality is being run by “Hologramas para la Libertad.”

 

The movement calls for citizens who “can not express yourself freely” to do so by becoming a hologram. To join the movement, citizens were asked to write a text message, record a voice message or record themselves on video to be turned into a hologram.

 

The support has been amazing with people from all over lending their words, voice and image to protest as free holograms.